Slip/Trip and Fall

In Irizarry v. 1915 Realty LLC, 2016 NY Slip Op 00009 (App Div. 1st Dept. Jan. 5, 2016), the Appellate Division, First Department reversed the lower court’s order granting summary judgment to defendant on plaintiff’s personal injury/premises liability/slip-and-fall case. Teh court explained: Triable issues of fact regarding whether defendant caused or created the wet stair condition…

Read More Wet Stairway Slip/Fall Case Survives Summary Judgment
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In Santiago v Weisheng Enters. LLC, the Appellate Division, First Department affirmed the denial of summary judgment to defendants on plaintiff’s personal injury claim. From the decision: Defendants property owner and lessee-restaurant failed to establish their entitlement to judgment as a matter of law, in this action where plaintiff alleges that he was injured when he…

Read More Defendants Not Entitled to Summary Judgment on Plaintiff’s Slip/Fall Claim
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In Taveras v 1149 Webster Realty Corp., 2015 NY Slip Op 09192, the court held that plaintiff’s trip-and-fall case should not have been dismissed: [W]e find that defendants in this case failed to meet their initial burden of establishing, prima facie, their entitlement to judgment as a matter of law by asserting that plaintiff could not…

Read More Plaintiff Adequately Identified Defect Causing Him to Fall; Summary Judgment for Defendants Overturned
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You may have heard that Al Sharpton’s daughter Dominique has sued the City of New York for $5 million to recover for injuries allegedly sustained in a trip-and-fall accident. Here’s her April 29, 2015 lawsuit. An article in yesterday’s NY Post noted that Ms. Sharpton “was a no-show [on Dec. 2, 2015] for the first court…

Read More Dominique Sharpton’s “No Show” in Her $5M Personal Injury Case Against the City of New York
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A recent case, Jaquez v. Lind-Ric Hous. Co., 48 Misc. 3d 1204(A), 17 N.Y.S.3d 383 (N.Y. Sup. Ct. June 19, 2015), illustrates the difficulties faced by plaintiffs in slip-and-fall cases, particularly those where the alleged defective condition is not a structural defect or a transitory condition (water, debris, etc) but rather the nature of the…

Read More Slip/Fall on “Slippery” Interior Stairs – Case Dismissed
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In litigation, the question of “personal jurisdiction” – i.e., whether the court has jurisdiction (power) over the person of the defendant – is arguably the most critical/important: If the court does not have jurisdiction, plaintiff loses without regard to the merits of the case. Stern v. Four Points by Sheraton Ann Arbor Hotel, 2015 NY Slip…

Read More Online Hotel Reservation Insufficient to Establish Personal Jurisdiction in New York
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In Ashton v. EQR Riverside A, LLC, 2015 NY Slip Op 07916 (Oct. 29, 2015), the court affirmed the dismissal of plaintiff’s trip-and-fall case. This case, like many premises liability cases, turned on the critical issue of “notice”. From the decision: It was undisputed that defendants did not have actual or constructive notice of the height differential…

Read More Trip/Fall Case Properly Dismissed; Expert’s Conclusion Was “Speculative”
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In Sikora v Earth Leasing Prop. Ltd. Liab. Co., 2015 NY Slip Op 07918 (App. Div. 1st Dept. Oct. 29, 2015) – a personal injury ice slip/fall case – the Appellate Division, First Department affirmed a lower court decision denying defendant’s motion for summary judgment. The court explained: Defendant failed to establish entitlement to judgment as a matter of law…

Read More Plaintiff Survives Summary Judgment in Ice Slip/Fall Personal Injury Case
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In Torres v. Nine-O-Seven Holding Corp., the court granted defendants’ motion for summary judgment on plaintiff’s sidewalk trip-and-fall case. After examination of the photographs and the other evidence presented in the record, including plaintiff’s deposition testimony, and considering all the relevant factors, this Court finds that as a matter of law the alleged defect in the…

Read More Trip-and-Fall Case Dismissed; Sidewalk Defect Was “Trivial” as a Matter of Law
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